Food Fight
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  • Atari
  • Atari
  • Action - Arcade Port (example - Asteroids)
  • 1987
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  • $5.00
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7  |  A Game John Belushi Would Have Liked
Darryl B. , 3/31/2006 10:27:39 AM
With people whining about things left and right, Food Fight, the arcade game, was never, to the best of my knowledge, targeted and griped about for it's sheer violent content.

But that's because the violence was overlooked by making this shooter being cute and clever, replacing flying bullets with food. And when is airborne food considered violent? (Well, except for that one episode of the 80s-90s tv comedy Night Court when a guy got hit in the face with a pie that was still frozen, I mean...)

In the arcade original, you played Charley Chuck, a kid that really irked several chefs for some reason, and now they're after you. You have to cross a screen from one side to the other to make it to an ice cream cone and eat it -- with one giant bite, unlike how mommy encouraged you to take small bites -- before it melts.

Sound simple? Not really, as the chefs are after you: touching any of them will result in losing a turn, and falling through one of the holes scattered throughout the screen will do the same. Either happening will result in all the food on the screen piling on top of you, to the chefs' happiness (doing a "Chuck Got Upchucked On" dance in the process, or something).

However, you have flying food at your disposal for a defense! Yep, passing over a pile of food will result in you grabbing a piece of whatever's in the pile, which you can then throw at the chefs. The chefs will re-appear a few seconds later, coming out of one of the holes in the screen, so you have to watch out! (And there's no banana peels for them to slip on, either.) Parsley is a good, short-distance weapon, since it's pretty big, whereas bananas travel a lot further, and look good doing so in the process, as they spin like a yellow boomerang, showcasing many a cute graphic in this game (which there's also beans and cakes [or maybe they're pies] among your food arsenal as well). However, the chefs can also toss food your way, and none of it's of the diet variety, either; hit and you get dog-piled with whatever food is left...

Every five screens, watermelons will also appear, which you will never run out of those for as long as you stand at a watermelon; all other foods will be spent if you take too many items out of a pile. These rounds are good for cranking up points by throwing watermelon at the chefs until the ice cream cone is almost totally melted, then run for it as it's warning sound emits, as you grotesquely swallow it whole (that's always bugged me, by the way...).

The controls worked well, and the sound effects (and especially the music) were good, as the game got faster and faster until you ran out of Chucks quicker than you could shake a bottle of Pepto Bismal at.

As per usual with 7800 arcade adaptions, this was a pretty close port of it, although I found it a bit easier and a little slower than the original. However, you can crank up the difficulty a notch before you start a game so you won't be playing a game forever.

After all, in what other way could you start a food fight and not get in trouble for it? (Even though John Belushi of Animal House didn't live to see the game.) 7/10

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